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Abstract

Experiments were conducted to assess the performance of various residential smoke alarms to kitchen fires and nuisance alarm cooking scenarios.  A structure representing a kitchen, living room and hallway was constructed to conduct the experiments. Eight different residential smoke alarms types, two photoelectric models (P1 and P2), two ionization models (I1 and I2), two dual sensor photoelectric/ionization models(D1 and D2), and two multi-sensor, intelligent models (M1 and M2) were used in this study.  The data gathered provided insight into the susceptibility of alarm activation from exposures to typical cooking events and alarm times for actual kitchen fires.  The effects of alarm technology and installation location on the propensity of an alarm to activate were examined.  In the kitchen fire experiments, all smoke alarms responded before hazardous conditions developed.  An ionization alarm (I1) tended to respond first compared to other co-located alarms.  Results show smoke alarms placed greater than 6 m from the kitchen range may provide less than 120 s of available safe egress time, which suggests the importance of a more central alarm location closer to the kitchen for this configuration.  Experiments were conducted to determine an alarm’s propensity to activate when exposed to particulates generated from eight typical cooking activities including toasting, frying, baking and broiling.  In most cases, the propensity to nuisance alarm decreased as the distance from the cooking source increased.  Two alarms, I1 and D2, experienced more nuisance alarm activations across the eight cooking activities than the other alarms.  The remaining alarms experienced about the same combined nuisance alarm frequency by averaging all cooking events for installation locations outside the kitchen.  Experiments showed combustible materials typically found on a counter top can spread flames to overhead cabinets, and a single empty 0.6 m wide 1.0 m tall wood-framed, pressboard cabinet can produce a peak heat release rate nearly sufficient to flashover a small room.  Alternatively, protective metal barrier on the bottom and side facing the range tended to limit the spread of flames to the cabinet and reduce the heat release rate.

Access the full paper  here .

DETROIT (WXYZ)

Kim Warner got the scare of her life behind the wheel of her Jeep Wrangler.  "I saw a flash under the hood," she remembers.  She says she was driving at a low speed when her brakes went out and the shifter jammed.  "I had both feet on the brake and my tires were spinning.  I noticed flames coming out the passenger side," she says.

Her boyfriend who was nearby ran, jumped in, and pulled her out of the SUV before it got worse.  "As I pulled her out that is when the flames came thru the dash," he said.

Chrysler sent an inspector, but the automaker said in a statement:  "The cause of the fire was deemed inconclusive by the investigator."

Read more...

 

Loose engine cover could cause fire

Fiat Chrysler is recalling 350,000 Dodge Journey crossovers due to a problem with the vehicle’s engine cover that could lead to a fire.

The covers can become dislodged and come in contact with exhaust components preventing them from moving. If that happens, it could cause a fire. The company has reports of three fires in Chile, involving one injury and no deaths.

Read more...

This recall involves battery-operated night lights with an AC adapter included.  The night light collection includes a pink hedgehog, a blue bird, a yellow rocket, an orange dino egg, a white soccer ball and a green shark.  The model numbers are printed on the bottom side of the night lights.

 

Name Model Number
Color
Size
Hedgehog 060-02-1397 Pink 3.5”(h)x 5.5”(w) Bird 060-02-1398 Blue 4.0”(h)x6.5”(w) Rocket 060-02-1399 Yellow 6.0”(h)x4.75”(w) Dino Egg
060-02-1400 Orange 6.0”(h)x4.75”(w) Soccer Ball
060-02-1401 White 5.0”(h)x5.25”(w) Shark 060-02-1402 Green 3.5”(h)x6.9”(w)

Description:

This recall involves Polaris Youth RZR® 170 EFI recreational off-highway vehicles with model number R15YAV17AA/AF and VINs between RF3YAV170FT000076 and RF3YAV17XFT005141. To see the complete list, visit the firm’s website. The VIN is on the left-hand front frame tube. They were sold in both blue and red. The blue models have a “170 EFI” decal on the right and left side of the hood and an “RZR” decal on the right and left front fenders. The red models have a “170 EFI” decal on the right and left front fenders and a “RZR” decal on the right and left rear fenders.

See the full details at the Polaris website.

Description

This recall involves GreenWorks 12 amp electric blower/vacs. The blower/vacs have a green motor housing and a black blower tube and restrictor nozzle. They measure 12 inches high and 34 inches long. Recalled blower/vacs have model number 24022 with a serial number between GWS0350001 through GWS2280500 or model number 24072 with a serial number between GWR1310001 through GWS2281100. The model number, serial number,  “greenworks” and “ELECTRIC BLOWER/MULCHER WITH BAG” are printed on the side of the motor housing.  Model 24022 has a two-speed switch. Model 24072 has a variable speed switch.

 

Read the full details at CPSC

The next CCAI Training Seminar will be held November 2 - 4, 2015

Passing of Rob Van Wormer

The following article was submitted by Randy Martin, CCAI Chaplain.

 

As I arrived at the parking lot of the HP Pavillion in San Jose, I was greeted by a red sea of fire apparatus.  The San Jose Fire Department had provided two ladder trucks that were set up in the parking lot; ladders fully extended facing each other with a very large American flag hanging between them.  It was a spectacular site, and what an awesome tribute to Rob.  The flag hanging is this manner has always impressed me.

After arriving, I located the Chaplain that would be performing the service.  As it turned out, he was a Captain that had I worked with in Riverside, California.  It was good to see him again.

The procession that entered the parking lot was laden with fire apparatus and was followed by the limousines that carried the family.  The procession route was lined with fire personnel standing at attention and saluting as the fire engine, which carried the casket, made its way through the crowd.

The San Jose Fire Department had positioned two additional ladder trucks with their ladders fully extended, donning the American flag hanging between them inside the Pavillion.

The service opened with music and a warm welcome to everyone in attendance followed by prayer, guest speakers, the eulogy, and a message to the Fire Family, a Law Enforcement prayer and a song.  The Benediction was followed by the Fire Fighters prayer, the Last Alarm and the Riffle Volley.  Taps rang out from the bag pipes, which always gets to me.  In closing, they had the Flag Folding after which the pipes and drums played Amazing Grace and ended with the presentation of gifts for the Family.

Rob was only on this earth for 47 years; he left us way too soon! He will be missed dearly.

Fire Chaplain

Randy Martin

Remembering 9-11

September 11, 2001

CCAI
Remembering those who gave the ultimate sacrifice
and those they left behind.

Outfitting Your Smartphone for Fire Investigations

by:

Cathleen E. Corbitt-Dipierro

Stonehouse Media Incorporated

www.interfire.org

Smartphones are quickly taking over the US cellular phone hardware market — iPhone, Droid, Blackberry, Palm, just to name a few brands.  With their advanced computing capability, smartphones are enabling users to perform more and more tasks on their phone than just the simple calling and texting.  This computing power is harnessed by “apps,” which are application software programs used on smartphones.


For the fire investigator, the smartphone can become a handy tool in your daily work, but only if you know how to outfit it.  This article highlights some of the core apps that fire investigators can use every day to assist in managing their investigative and administrative work.  One caution before we begin: the investigator should be aware that any investigative information kept on your smartphone is not secure and also may be discoverable in a future legal proceeding.  For that reason, we’ve confined the discussion of apps in this article to those where case-based investigative information is not stored or shared.  At all times, exercise the utmost caution with investigative information.

Read more...

Man sets fire to house drying shorts, socks in microwave

We’ve all had days when inclement weather, a busted clothes dryer or a fiendish combination of the two has us scrambling to dry our under-things for that hot date or big job interview. A man in Weymouth, Utah had probably thought he’d found the ideal solution when he thought to dry his two pairs of shorts and socks in his microwave. That is, until he had to be rescued from the fire in his apartment. Neighbors led him to safety after they heard a smoke alarm go off and firefighters quickly put out the fire. All clothing items were destroyed. "The fire safety message here is to never put clothing of any kind in the microwave or an oven to attempt to dry them," said a spokesperson for Dorset fire and rescue.

A Basic Premise - People Lie

by Paul Francois & Enrique Garcia (Third Degree Communications)

It is a basic human instinct to lie to avoid consequences. We discover this around 3 years of age and it develops and spirals out of control from then on. Some people are really good liars and others not so much. But the one constant is that everybody does it to some extent. For those of you in the law enforcement community, we're not telling you anything you don't already know. For cops, getting lied to is a daily occurrence.

Read more..

More Articles...

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