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Abstract

Based on data from the U.S. Fire Administration’s (USFA’s) National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) and the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA’s) annual fire department experience survey, NFPA estimates that during 2007-2011, local fire departments responded to an average of 334,200 brush, grass or forest fires per year. In most, less than one acre burned. These incidents accounted for 24% of all fires reported to local fire departments. This study examines the circumstances and causal factors of: a) brush or brush and grass mixture fires; b) grass fires; c) forest, woods, or wildland fires; and d) total brush, grass, and forest fires, including unclassified natural vegetation fires. One in five was intentionally set. The most common heat source was a hot ember or ashes. Open burning, high winds, and smoking materials were also frequent factors. Lightning accounted for a larger percentage of forest, woods, or wildland fires than the other types of natural vegetation fires.

AbstractBased on data from the U.S. Fire Administration’s (USFA’s) National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) and the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA’s) annual fire department experience survey, NFPA estimates that during 2007-2011, local fire departments responded to an average of 334,200 brush, grass or forest fires per year. In most, less than one acre burned. These incidents accounted for 24% of all fires reported to local fire departments. This study examines the circumstances and causal factors of: a) brush or brush and grass mixture fires; b) grass fires; c) forest, woods, or wildland fires; and d) total brush, grass, and forest fires, including unclassified natural vegetation fires. One in five was intentionally set. The most common heat source was a hot ember or ashes. Open burning, high winds, and smoking materials were also frequent factors. Lightning accounted for a larger percentage of forest, woods, or wildland fires than the other types of natural vegetation fires.

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Description

This recall involves two Scag Liberty-Z zero-turn lawn mowers; model SZL48-22KT with serial numbers K7100001 through K7102353 and model SZL52-24KT with serial numbers K7200001 through K7202020.  The model and serial numbers are printed on a vertical plate under the mower’s seat. “Scag” in red letters, “Liberty Z” in white letters and a blue “Z” is printed on a plate below the front of the seat. The mowers have an orange base with two orange and black steering handles. The mowers also have two large black with orange rim wheels in the back of the mower and two smaller black with orange rim wheels in the front of the mower.

 

Full details can be found at CPSC

Description

This recall involves SubstiTUBE IS T8 LED lamps. The recalled lamps are white, cylindrical in shape and measure 48 inches long and 1 inch in diameter. “OSRAM SubtiTUBE® IS LED T8” is printed on a silver label affixed to the end of lamps. The model number 73312-1 or 73315-1 also appears on the label beneath the statement “Compatible LED T8 for use with instant start T8 electronic ballasts.”

 

Full details can be found at CPSC.

In the new issue of NFPA Journal®, President Jim Shannon said the Association will focus on the leading causes of home fires, including cooking. "We also need to continue to push hard for home fire sprinklers. That's still a large priority for NFPA, and we plan to work very aggressively in 2014 on our residential sprinkler initiative," he said.

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NFPA 921, Guide for Fire and Explosion Investigations plays a fundamental role in fire and explosion investigations. A new edition of NFPA 921 is scheduled to be published in 2014. For years, this document has played a critical role in the training, education and job performance of fire and explosion investigators. It also serves as one of the primary references used by the National Fire Academy to support its fire/arson-related training and education programs. It is imperative that investigators understand the scope, purpose and application of this document, especially since it will be used to judge the quality and thoroughness of their investigations.

NFPA 921, Guide for Fire and Explosion Investigations plays a fundamental role in fire and explosion investigations. A new edition of NFPA 921 is scheduled to be published in 2014. For years, this document has played a critical role in the training, education and job performance of fire and explosion investigators. It also serves as one of the primary references used by the National Fire Academy to support its fire/arson-related training and education programs. It is imperative that investigators understand the scope, purpose and application of this document, especially since it will be used to judge the quality and thoroughness of their investigations.

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SAN DIEGO - A Team 10 and Scripps News investigation found arson fires are not investigated properly in many American cities -- including San Diego -- due to a chaotic patchwork of reporting systems and standards.

Many deliberately set building fires are not reported to the federal government.

Nationally, just 5 percent of all residential building fires are intentionally set, according to the National Fire Incident Reporting System, which is part of the Department of Homeland Security.  Data collected by Scripps News suggests the national arson rate to be significantly higher.

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President's Message

Eric Emmanuele, President CCAI 2015

emmanuele

I would like to welcome you to the California Conference of Arson Investigators (CCAI) website.  CCAI is a group of dedicated, hard-working and talented individuals devoted to the quality education of those responsible for investigating the cause of fires and the prosecution of arson.  Our membership consists of investigative professionals from both the public and private sectors: fire, police, insurance industry, law offices, utility companies, educators and engineering firms.  Regardless of our employer, we share the common goal of the accurate determination of the origin and cause of a fire and the fight against those who set them.

I have two goals I would love to accomplish during my term as President (2015-2016):

  1. Increase our membership numbers
  2. Increase the quality training opportunities available to our members
 

 

As I see it, these two goals are accomplished hand-in-hand, and with your assistance, completely reachable.  Our membership will grow as our training product expands. Over the past two years, we have made some major changes to our Roundtable program.  We have expanded our Roundtable locations to 18 and each coordinator has committed to four local training opportunities each year.  Each of the trainings provided comply with NFPA 921 and will help get you/keep you compliant with NFPA 1033.

I encourage you to take a look at our new Roundtable format.  We now list all scheduled Roundtable training opportunities statewide with one click on the Upcoming RT Training tab. You are welcome to attend any Roundtable anywhere in the state.  Are you receiving emails from your local training coordinator?  Email any one of them from the Roundtable Coordinator tab and ask them to add you to their list.  Looking for a specific training topic?  Want to host a training day locally?  E-mail your coordinator.

Please reach out to your colleagues and share with them the benefits of being a member of CCAI.  Include those you know in the fire service, law enforcement, insurance industry and any others that would benefit from a quality, multi-disciplinary fire investigation training.  If you have any ideas on how we may better serve our membership, or increase our membership numbers, please share them with us.

Stay safe out there,

ericemmanuele

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Location

1279 North White Avenue 
Pomona, California 91768 
Phone:  (909) 865-5004
Fax (909) 865-5024 
8:00 am - 5:00 pm 
Monday - Friday

 

 

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